Hungarian Stitch and Variations

Hungarian Stitch, like Mosaic Stitch, it made from three stitches in graduated sizes. The difference is that Hungarian is worked vertically, rather than diagonally.

This easy-to-work stitch has a variety of variations, which can all be used to add pretty textured fills to any shape in your needlepoint project. Many of the stitches can be worked in two or more colors. Continue Reading “Hungarian Stitch and Variations”

Tent Stitch Variations

Tent stitch is a common stitch used in nearly any type of needlepoint. These stitches are produced when a single stitch is worked diagonally over a single intersection of the canvas.

In addition to the three basic types – BasketweaveHalf Cross and Continental which are discussed in detail on the Basic Tent Stitch page, there are also several variations. Many of these these can be worked in more than one color. Continue Reading “Tent Stitch Variations”

Basic Needlepoint Stitches – Tent Stitch

Tent stitch is a common stitch used in nearly any type of needlepoint. These stitches are produced when a single stitch is worked diagonally over a single intersection of the canvas. There are three types, and each has a different use and degree of coverage. The three types of tent stitch are Basketweave StitchHalf Cross Stitch and Continental Stitch, and while the stitches may look the same on the surface, they are worked differently, and have their own pros and cons. Continue Reading “Basic Needlepoint Stitches – Tent Stitch”

Mosaic Stitch and Variations

Mosaic Stitch is made from small squares of stitching, each containing 3 stitches of graduating sizes.  It’s similar in shape to Scotch stitch, but a bit smaller.

This easy-to-work stitch has a variety of variations, which can all be used to add pretty textured fills to any shape in your needlepoint project. Many of the stitches can be worked in two or more colors. Continue Reading “Mosaic Stitch and Variations”

Stem Stitch

Stem Stitch or outline stitch is commonly used to make a thin outline around a shape. It can also be used as the stems and tendrils in a floral design, and can be made thicker by working the stitch over, rather than along, the marked line.

Stem stitch can also be used as a very pretty filling stitch. This is done by working rows of stitching close together. You can work the filling in the same color, or shade the area using different colors. Keep the length of each stitch the same for consistency when working the filled area. Continue Reading “Stem Stitch”

Scatter Stitches

Stitches that can be worked singly, without being attached to another stitch are called scatter stitches. These are the most common scatter stitches used in projects featured on this site, but there are many more. These include both single and compound stitches that are worked individually, like the tulip or wheatear stitches (members of the chain stitch family) or the fly stitch. Continue Reading “Scatter Stitches”

Fern, Feather and Fly Stitches

Fern, feather and fly stitches produce light, airy lines that can be used in bands and borders, to outline objects, or as an element of a design. Many of the stitches can be used to imitate natural textures, such as fronds, seaweed or pine needles.

There are many variations or fern, feather, and fly stitches, and many can be classified under more than one category. For example, the wheatear stitch is worked similarly to the fly stitch or fern stitch, but also features a looped stitch. Continue Reading “Fern, Feather and Fly Stitches”

Chevron Stitches

Chevron Stitches are stitches using a combination of diagonal stitches capped with straight stitches. These stitches look terrific used in borders or as bands in a project.

Chevron stitches can be worked as counted stitches, or pre-marked on the fabric and worked as surface stitches. The most common variations that you will find in projects from NeedleKnowledge are the basic chevron stitchdouble chevron stitch, along with variations of the laced chevron stitch. Continue Reading “Chevron Stitches”