• Wednesday , 22 March 2017

Redwork BOM Quilt

Redwork BOM Quilt

Stitch a  Redwork BOM Quilt this year! Redwork is the term used when working a pattern in basic embroidery stitches worked using red thread. It’s normally worked on white or natural-colored fabrics, and is usually finished as a quilt.

Stitching on red thread became popular in the 19th century after color-fast red dyes were invented – although red thread can still produce some bleeding or crocking, even today. However, the excess dye will normally wash out after a few extra washings – but do not dry the piece in between the washings or the excess dye could set on the fabric.

This pattern originally appeared in my book, Easy Heirloom Embroidery, which is now out of print. However, the pattern featuring  different bouquet of flowers for each month is just as timely now as it was 10 years ago when the book made its debut, so I’ll share it with you here on the NeedleKnowledge site as a freebie!

Machine embroidery aficionados will be happy to know that there are digitized versions of the patterns on the WindStar Embroidery Designs site.

*NOTE: Because this quilt requires such a large amount of floss, I have included a link to the Amazon.com page where the floss can be purchased by the box – there are 12 skeins per box. You’ll find the link in the materials list, as well as the bottom of the page.

Materials Needed:
  • 3 yards white 100% cotton broadcloth, washed and pressed
  • Size 9 hand embroidery needles
  • One 52 x 56 inch piece EACH of batting and backing fabric
  • 6 yards red double-fold binding
  • White all-purpose thread for assembly and red for binding
  • 1/2 yard checkered or gingham fabric for inner border
  • 18 to 20 skeins of red six-strand embroidery floss (I used *DMC 6-Strand Embroidery Cotton Floss, Color 498)
Directions:

Download the free patterns. These include a yardage cutting guide, as well as the flower pattern for each month. Each is given as separate PDF pattern below.

You will need to download and print them all full size – this is important to note if you want the designs to properly fit the blocks. Most printers will scale images when printing, and you’ll want to make sure these feature is turned off before printing.

For tips on successfully printing patterns full-size, refer to the Printing Tutorial featured in the Knowledge Nuggets section.


3 Comments

  1. Barb in BC
    April 29, 2014 at 12:53 pm - Reply

    Thank You so much! This will be a great summer project for me!

  2. Pam
    April 29, 2014 at 1:35 pm - Reply

    Beautiful designs! Thank you for sharing.

  3. Diane H
    May 1, 2014 at 6:46 am - Reply

    Thank you for this lovely pattern.

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