• Sunday , 23 April 2017

Making a Press’n Seal® Transfer

This tutorial utilizes something you may already have in your kitchen – Glad® Press’n Seal®  – and is a terrific way to transfer an embroidery design to thick fabrics, such as velvet or felt, or fabrics where the transferred design is difficult to see, such as on dark fabrics or printed fabrics.

It’s also a terrific way to transfer a design where you do not want to leave any residue or markings behind, or on a lightweight fabric that needs an extra bit of stability while working the embroidery.

I love the Press’n Seal® Transfer technique and have used in on a variety of fabrics. Here’s how to use it…

Press'n Seal® Transfer - 1

Supplies

Gather your supplies. You will need a printed pattern that is ready to trace, a permanent fine-line marking pen, Glad® Press’n Seal® wrap, fabric (I used wool velvet in this tutorial) and your basic embroidery supplies.

Press'n Seal® Transfer - 2

Trace the pattern.

Next, cut a piece of Press’n Seal to fit the embroidery pattern. Lay the wrap over the pattern carefully to avoid wrinkles or bubbles. Using the permanent pen, trace the pattern through and directly on top of the wrap. For larger images, use multiple lengths of wrap.

Press'n Seal® Transfer - 3

Press the wrap in place.

Carefully remove the marked wrap and press it onto the fabric. It’s easiest to start at the middle and smooth any wrinkles outwards as you press it in place.  There’s no need to pin – the adhesive in the wrap holds in firmly in place.

Trim any excess wrap that hangs beyond the edges of the fabric.

Press'n Seal® Transfer - 4

Embroider and remove the wrap.

Embroider the design as you would any other project, stitching through the wrap and into the fabric. When you have completed the embroidery, carefully peel away the wrap, leaving the embroidery area behind. It’s best to remove the wrap from small areas as a time, and a small pair of tweezers comes in handy for removing stuck or small bits.


2 Comments

  1. Jo Darby
    April 11, 2014 at 12:28 pm - Reply

    Well, this looks neat! I plan to try this soon and I hope its ok that I shared your tip with Mary Corbet of http://www.needlenthread.com

    thanks!

    • Editor Needleknowledge
      April 11, 2014 at 12:38 pm - Reply

      Thanks, Jo – it’s definitely a useful alternative when working on heavy fabrics, those with a nap, or fabrics where marking just isn’t practical.

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